Category Archives: Your Week In Books

Your week in books#37

  • The Hollywood Reporter talks to Daniel Radcliffe, Jack Huston, and Ben Foster about “Kill Your Darlings”, a film about legendary Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. It’s already premiered at Sundance and is apparently being received positively. (Source)
Chris Kluwe

Chris Kluwe

  • In case you guys still don’t know who Chris Kluwe is, he’s the Minnesota Vikings punter who became famous when he stood up for fellow American football player Brendon Ayanbadejo, free speech, and marriage equality with an eloquent letter published in Deadspin and The Huffington Post. He also popularized the term “lustful cockmonster” and was named Salon’s Sexiest Man of 2012. ANYWAY, all of those links are to make sure you guys are all sufficiently intrigued to check out his book “Beautifully Unique Sparkleponies”, which will probably come out June 25. (Source)
  • It’s the 50th anniversary of the publication of Sylvia Plath’s “The Bell Jar”, and the Guardian has a couple of articles about the Plath and the people she left behind. One is about one of Plath’s close friends, Elizabeth Sigmund, while the other is a verbatim interview with Olwyn Hughes, Plath’s sister-in-law and literary executor. Olwyn and Sylvia didn’t like each other very much, and that really comes across when you read the interview with Olwyn. (Source 1)(Source 2)
  • Wired has an incredibly detailed analysis of the contract Bilbo signed in “The Hobbit”. (Source)
  • io9 has a great ongoing series on pulp science fiction during periods of totalitarianism that you guys should definitely check out. (Source)
  • Still with io9, they have a list of SF authors talking about the books they wish they’d written themselves. (Source)
  • In Scotland, they have free pole-dancing classes in the library. The library is definitely OPEN. (Source)
  • Have you read some Frankensteinbeck recently? Check out these illustrated literary puns! (Source)
  • I have honestly not read any stuff by Kieron Gillen, but I do love me some Young Avengers. The Guardian’s got a list of work that he’s done, and Phonogram certainly looks interesting! I’m now excited to pick up Young Avengers this week! (Source)
  • And in a somewhat Avengers-related vein, did you guys know that Sebastian Stan — Bucky from “Captain America: The First Avenger” — is on Broadway right now in a production of William Inge’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “Picnic”? He’s apparently shirtless in most of it. And trust me when I say you should check out what he looks like shirtless after the jump. (Source)

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Your week in books#36

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  • It’s Kenkoy‘s birthday today! (Source)
  • The shortlist for the Man Asian literary prize has been announced, and it features two authors who’ve already clashed during the Man Booker. (Source)
  • The New York Times has a fascinating piece on the book boys of Mumbai. (Source)
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Sylvia Plath

  • The Independent has an article on the Sylvia Plath “curse”. Fascinating stuff, especially when it comes to the Hughes side of the equation. (Source)
  • Friends of mine know I love me some fries from McDonalds as much as I love my books. In the UK, they’ve put those two things together. Why do I live here again? (Source)
  • Will everything we own end up in the cloud? The Independent talks about a generation that has dumped paper books for Kindles, among other things. (Source)
  • The Guardian seems to think that The Independent is right, as it reports that the sale of printed books in the UK has sunk to a nine-year low. (Source)
  • Saladin Ahmed, author of “Throne of the Crescent Moon“, writes about world-building in fantasy fiction over at National Public Radio. (Source)
  •  Thoughts that went through my head while reading Flavorpill’s 30 Most Anticipated Books fo 2013: “Oooh, new Maurice Sendak! NEW NABOKOV WAT?!? OMG FINALLY NEW MARISHA PESSL (possibly)!” (Source)
  • Take a look at these examples of literary graffiti from all over the world. (Source)

Your week in books#35

  • The best way to describe the above video is through the words of Tumblr user and The Shoebox Project co-author, Rave:

“Okay I’ve been sitting on this knowledge for months and months, because ever since realizing none of my other friends had seen “North and South,” I have regarded Richard Armitage as my personal property/cross to bear. (KEEP HIM SECRET! KEEP HIM SAFE!!!) However, the time has come for you to know this: there is an audiobook of Richard Armitage reading classic regency romance “Venetia,” by Georgette Heyer, and it’s mercy status.

Like, is this the best Heyer in the world? Nah! Is the hero kind of unfortunately rapey in that way Georgette’s heroes sometimes veer toward where of course the heroine secretly likes it? Sure, a little! Is this audiobook Richard Armitage rumbling tenderly in your ear at every possible vibration, for five hours? You bet your sweet dixie cup ass it is!!! Cross your legs on the bus and blush through your daily commute, because this is HAPPENING to you. (BONUS: Richard Armitage also plays such characters as a sexy debutante and a tearful upper-crust matron. IT IS AMAZING!)”

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Your week in books#34

  • All of the cool kids have blogged about it already, so let me just add that I had a great time at the Filipino ReaderCon last week! Our “Fifty Shades of Grey” discussion went well, thank God, and it was nice to see so many readers in one place!
  • The National Book Development Board also released their latest survey on the state of reading in the country. I haven’t perused it yet, but will be writing about it for the paper! (Source)
  • National Book Store is bringing Canada-based Filipino writer Jennifer Hillier here to the country! She’s set to do a talk and a book singing at the Powerbooks at Greenbelt 4. (Source)
  • A long, long time ago, when I wrote a review about “I Am Number Four“, I linked to an article from the New Yorker about James Frey’s “fiction factory”. However, it would seem that “The Rise of Nine” is no longer following that particular model. (Source)

  • Anyone who knows me knows that I love me some “The Lord of the Rings”. And that I also love me a lot of other authors. What better way to ring those two things together than with alternative author’s versions of “The Lord of the Rings”? I particularly liked the D. H. Lawrence one. (Source)
  • io9 has some really great samples from Scott Westerfeld and Keith Thompson’s “Manual of Aeronautics”! I am still waiting with bated breath for a copy to show up at my local National Book Store. (Source)
  • In case you guys didn’t know, Superman and Wonder Woman are now officially a couple. I thought they were already doing it before! (Source)
  • While I still haven’t gotten around to reading “Catching Fire”, I do know that Finnick Odair gets all the ladies and the boys who like boys all hot under the collar and stuff. And I do have to say that Sam Claflin – who has just been cast as Odair in the movie adaptation — is certainly doing that for me. What do you guys think? Pictures under the cut!

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Your week in books#33

Watch thinking man’s porn star Stoya have an orgasm while reading Supervert’s “Necrophilia Variations”

  • I’ve been so remiss about blogging lately, that I haven’t told you guys about the great big Filipino Readercon happening at the Filipinas Heritage Library tomorrow. I’ll be there; you guys should check it out as well! (Source)
  • Jeffrey Eugenides and Junot Diaz do some historical cosplay for a Vogue spread on Edith Wharton. (Source)
  • I’m not really familiar with DC Pierson’s work, but he sure showed ” ? Idiot America ~ ???????x ?” that it’s a bad idea to outsource your summer reading to the internet. (Source)

  • The Guardian has an article compiling 20 irrefutable theories of book cover design. One of them involves kittens. (Source)
  • I haven’t read Yann Martel’s “Life of Pi” yet, but I’m sure a lot of you guys have. If you’re in the vicinity of the New York film festival, Ang Lee’s movie adaptation of the book is set to open it. (Source)
  • And since we’re “in” New York, here’s a cute little thing about New York bookstores from the New York Times. Say New York one more time. New York. (Source)
  • Self-publishing is all the rage these days, especially after E.L. James and Amanda Hocking, so the New York Times has compiled a handy list of the advantages and disadvantages that come with doing it your way. (Source)
  • Former reality show star and New York Times bestselling author *sigh* Lauren Conrad got a lot of people riled up after she put up a video on her Youtube channel of her slicing up copies of Lemony Snicket’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events” for a craft project. She’s since taken the video down, but on the internet, everything lives forever. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3)
  • What does Lemony Snicket have to say about all this then? I quote:

“It has always been my belief that people who spend too much time with my work end up as lost souls, drained of reason, who lead lives of raving emptiness and occasional lunatic violence. What a relief it is to see this documented.”

Ouch. (Source)

  • Finally, Out Magazine has an interview with Stephen Chbosky, Ezra Miller, Logan Lerman, and Johnny Simmons regarding the big screen adaptation of Chbosky’s “The Perks of Being A Wallflower”. Ezra Miller comes out as queer in it, if any one of you is interested. Because I know I am. (Source)

And don’t even front that you don’t want to see the photos, which you can find under the cut.

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Your week in books#32

  • All my RL friends know that I’m not averse to a little erotica — or pornography, whatever you want to call it — and it seems that erotica is exactly what’s floating everybody’s boat in America right now. “Fifty Shades of Grey”, an erotic novel that is being described as “Mommy porn” and “Twilight for grown-ups”, has just been bought bought by Vintage Books for a reported seven-figure sum. And yes, it’s the same Vintage that gives us those literary classics with such beautiful covers. (Source)
  • This was all over Facebook and Twitter the past week, but in case you don’t know yet, The Guardian reports that 500 new fairytales have been discovered in an archive in Germany. You can read one of them “The Turnip Princess” over here. (Source)
  • Here’s another discovery for you guys. An archivist stumbles upon a 111-year-old short film that features characters from Charles Dickens’ novel “Bleak House”, making it the world’s oldest Charles Dickens film. (Source)
  • I’m linking to this story on the American Academy of Arts and Letters because of this great Michael Chabon quote: “I knew that when the gray came in it was only a matter of time before my augustness would be recognized.” (Source)
  • Movie adaptation news! Reese Witherspoon just bought the movie rights to writer Cheryl Strayed’s memoir and plans to star as Strayed in the movie adaptation. (Source)

I'm sure you guys can tell who drew this.

  • And just so we go full circle back to erotica, did you guys know that Theodor Seuss Geisel — or Dr. Seuss, as he’s more popularly known — wrote and illustrated a book for adults? And by adults, I mean adults? It was called “The Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History’s Barest Family” and it was a humongous flop. Check out the rest of the illustrations over at The Atlantic! (Source)

Your weeks in books#31

It’s been a while since we’ve had one of these things!

  • Of course, the biggest thing happening in the country this March — at least for fans of YA — is the upcoming visit by bestselling author Lauren Oliver. She’ll be signing books at the Powerbooks at Greenbelt 4 on March 25, 3 p.m. And, five fans may even get to have lunch with her! Details are over at National Book Store’s Facebook page. (Source)
  • Lauren Oliver isn’t the only person that National Book Store is bringing over! As reported by Comic Book Resources, Mark Millar will also be visiting the country in May! (Source)
  • The University of the Philippines is also holding a month-long book sale in celebration of its 47th anniversary! All UP Press titles, bestsellers, and new releases will be sold at a 20 percent discount, and all consigned titles at a 5 percent discount. The book sale runs from March 1 – 31, 2012. The UP Press bookstore is located at E. de los Santos Street, UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City and is open from Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 12:00 noon and 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.
  • A book blog by the Guardian ponders on what effect the increasing popularity of book trailers has on the books themselves. (Source)
  • Batman is named the greatest comic book hero. Of the top 10 heroes listed, Wonder Woman is the only…woman. (Source)
  • After facing protests from a group called “One Million Moms”, Life with Archie #16 — featuring the interracial gay marriage of character Kevin Keller — flies off the bookshelves. (Source)
  • The New York Times has a really interesting story on The Physical Archive of the Internet Arhive, which seeks to “collect one copy of every book.” (Source)

Your week in books#30

  • When I was a lot younger, I was really into the film “Snow Falling On Cedars”, so much so that I had to cut back on my obsessive buying of buttered corn (Don’t ask.) just so I could save up to buy a copy of the book. More than a decade later (!), I still haven’t gotten around to reading the book, and David Guterson has won the Literary Review’s “Bad Sex in Fiction” award. (Source)
  • Should I be worried that Amazon has acquired Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books? (Source)
  • Aside from buying Marshall Cavendish, Amazon is also investing $6 million dollars for the authors who participate in its Kindle Lending Library. (Source)
  • I have to admit that as of late, my resistance to ebooks and ebook readers has been slowly but surely deteriorating. I’ve been eyeing the Kindle Fire for a while now, and if I get my finances in order — probably sometime the next millennium — I may actually get one. So what to do when even diehard “solid book” fans like myself are considering changing sides? Publishers seem to have decided that making books prettier is the answer. (Source)

 

Jane Austen?

  • That painting over there is supposedly Jane Austen, author of “Pride and Prejudice”, “Sense and Sensibility”, and “Emma”. Certainly looks better than the other famous Jane Austen portrait, where she looks like she just noticed someone farted in the drawing room. (Source)
  • In England, poet laureate Ted Hughes — who most people probably know more as Sylvia Plath’s husband — is being honored with a slab at Westminster Abbey. (Source)
  • I was introduced to the works of Kurt Vonnegut by Taylor Hanson (Don’t ask.), and I’ve loved his works ever since. Even the new biography that paints him as a bitter, angry man with a temper isn’t going to change that. (Source)
  • FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT. Here’s what “Watchmen”, “V for Vendetta” and “Lost Girls” creator Alan Moore has to say about “300″ author Frank Miller (TEAM ALAN MOORE!) (Source):

“Frank Miller is someone whose work I’ve barely looked at for the past 20 years. I thought the Sin City stuff was unreconstructed misogyny; 300 [a 1998 comic book series] appeared to be wildly ahistoric, homophobic and just completely misguided. I think that there has probably been a rather unpleasant sensibility apparent in Frank Miller’s work for quite a long time.”

Your week in books#29

  • Here’s another trailer for Disney’s “John Carter”, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burrough’s “A Princess of Mars”. This one doesn’t look as impressive as the one released months ago, but I am always willing to shell out money for shirtless Taylor Kitsch. Also, Michael “The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay” Chabon wrote the script.
  • At around the same time that the trailer for “John Carter” made its online debut, the trailer for “Hugo” — Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Brian Selznick’s Caldecott-winning novel — was also vying for people’s eyeballs. Now it’s just been named the best film of 2011 by the National Board of Review. (Source)
  • Speaking of the bests of 2011, the New York Times has published its list of the 10 best books of 2011. (Source)
  • I’ve been an ebook denier for so long now, but I have to admit that as 2012 approaches my stance is slowly, slowly softening. Heck, even Ray Bradbury has changed his mind, finally allowing “Fahrenheit 451″ to be made available as an ebook.

  • The above illustration by artist Kevin Bolk has gotten so popular, even The Guardian is writing about it. In case it’s not obvious what it’s about, Bolk drew the male Avengers the way Black Widow was posed in the movie’s first few promotional materials. (Source)
  • Gabriel Garcia-Marquez wins a 17-year legal fight centered around his novel, “Chronicle of a Death Foretold”. The other man in the fight, Miguel Reyes Palencia, says that the character of Bayardo San Roman was based on him and that he deserved co-author credits as well as 50 percent of the book’s royalties. (Source)
  • Check out new images from “Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows” over at Cinemablend! (Source)
  •  In “Ender’s Game” news, Filipino-American actress Hailee Steinfeld is in negotiations to be part of the film adaptation’s cast. (Source)
  • Christopher Meloni, famous for his butt scenes in “Oz”, is apparently interested in being part of the fifth season of “True Blood”. If any more hot guys join that show I am going to have to buy an HD TV. (Source)
  • Known beautiful man and maybe gay Ben Whishaw is set to play Q in the newest Bond movie, “Skyfall”. And in case you have no idea what he looks like, check the pics under the cut! (Source)

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Your week in books#28

  • Legendary fantasy and science fiction author Anne McCaffrey died of a stroke last Monday at her home in Ireland. Best known for her “Dragonriders of Pern” series, Anne McCaffrey is also the first woman to win a Hugo Award for fiction, the first woman to win a Nebula Award, and the first author to get into the New York Times bestseller list with an science fiction title. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • In more “Akira-That-Is-Not-Akira” casting news, it appears that there is now a shortlist of very white actors set to play a very Japanese character. Among the names being floated are Michael Pitt from “Boardwalk Empire”, Richard Madden from “Game of Thrones”, and Paul Dano from “Little Miss Sunshine”. (Source)

Asa Butterfield

  • Meanwhile, the other bit of casting new floating around on the web is the supposed casting of 14-year-old British actor Asa Butterfield in the role of Ender, for the big screen adaptation of Orson Scott Card’s “Ender’s Game“. I haven’t read the book yet — Card’s Mormonism conflicts with my homosexuality — so I’d like to know what you guys think of this news. Yay or nay? (Source)
  • The people behind the Oxford English Dictionary have declared the phrase “squeezed middle” as the word of the year. Correct me if I’m wrong here, but isn’t a phrase something entirely different from a word? Don’t want to argue with the Oxford English Dictionary though. (Source)
  • The New York Times lists down the 100 notable books of 2011. Some of the titles in the list are Jeffrey Eugenides’ “The Marriage Plot”, John Sayles’ “A Moment In The Sun”, and Haruki Murakami’s “1Q84″. (Source)