Tag Archives: book to movie

Your week in books #12

It’s been a busy week for me since the “Deathly Hallows” premiere, with interviews left and right as well as a few hectic days at the office as well. Nothing to complain about, but it hasn’t really been making it easy for me to take off a few books from my “to-read” pile. Hopefully, I can blog about a couple of books by next week.

In the meantime, enjoy this week’s selection of book news!

  • With “Harry Potter” over for the time being — there’s still Pottermore, after all — people are looking to J.K. Rowling and what she has in store for the rest of the world. Rowling isn’t say much, though, other than that she is “working hard” on it. Here’s to hoping that she doesn’t end up like A.A. Milne. (Source)
  • There’s an interesting post over at Jezebel about the women in the Harry Potter universe, how empowered most of them are, and a little bit of speculation about what it could mean for future YA franchises in books and movies. There’s also a lot of healthy and interesting discussion in the comments section, so be sure to check it out! (Source)
  • To be quite honest, I have no idea what exactly Digital Adaptations is all about, and the interview with its executive producer over at Kotaku hasn’t exactly made things clearer for me either. From what I can understand, they’re adapting books to look a little like Microsoft Encarta’s Mindmaze and a little like those Flash games where you look for stuff hidden in backgrounds. I don’t know if that’s going to be terribly exciting, but I’m willing to see what they come up with. (Source)
  • Oxford University shelled out $1.6 million for 68-pages of an unfinished Jane Austen manuscript. It was supposed to be 80 pages, but the first 12 pages are already owned by the Morgan Library and Museum in New York. (Source, Source)
  • My birthday is in a few months, so would anybody be interested in gifting me with the pretty little book you can see on the right? It sounds like a lot of fun. I quote:

“The Elements of Style was first published in 1918. Think about that for a moment. In 1918, gay meant happy, opium derivatives were prescribed for headaches, and top hats and monocles were un-ironic fashion choices.”

  • Finally, trailers for upcoming book to movie adaptations. The first one is Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo“, an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s Caldecott-winning novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret“. Young stars Asa Butterfield and Chloe Moretz will be acting alongside Ben Kingsley, Christopher Lee, and Helen McCrory.

 

I haven’t read the book, so I don’t know how faithful it is. Looks interesting!

  • This second one is for “John Carter“, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs “A Princess of Mars“. It stars Taylor Kitsch, which is all the reason I need, frankly. But to find out that the script is by Michael Chabon? Michael “The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay” Chabon? I WILL BE FIRST IN LINE.

 

Will I pay P300 to see Taylor Kitsch in various states of undress? You bet.

Book to movie EXTRAVAGANZA!

So last week, Summit Entertainment came out with its first trailer for Paul Anderson’s “The Three Musketeers IN 3D” (Emphasis mine) and it looks like a right mess. Slow motion musketeering (That is totally a legit word, shut up), Milla Jovovich’s Lady de Winter being all Alice from Resident Evil in the wrong era, and A FLYING SHIP. I mean, WAT EVEN.

If it weren’t for the fact that Orlando Bloom is in it, I wouldn’t even be mildly interested. I may watch it on October 14.

And as it turns out, it’s not the only book to movie adaptation coming out in the following months. Twelve book to movie adaptations are coming out this year, and I thought it would be fun to take a look at all of them and see which one is going to crush your book reading experience forever.
Continue reading Book to movie EXTRAVAGANZA!

A (shirtless) addendum

While I found out yesterday that “I Am Number Four” isn’t exactly something to crow about, it really hasn’t dampened my enthusiasm about watching the upcoming movie adaptation (in the comfort of my own home and probably not in the cinemas).

Now why would I still be interested in the movie when the source material isn’t up to par? It’s not like DJ Caruso has been known to come up with cinematic masterpieces. Am I expecting the screenwriters — one of whom wrote for Joss Whedon’s “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” — to do some magic and come up with a much more engaging movie? Not really.

No, the real reason is so much shallower than all of you think. I am anticipating this movie because of Alex Pettyfer — and the possibility of shirtless scenes.

If there was one thing that made reading “I Am Number Four” bearable was the fact that I was imagining the many gratuitous opportunities for Alex Pettyfer to shuck off his shirt — and the book does provide a lot of instances.

And trust me, shirtless Alex Pettyfer is something to look forward to