Tag Archives: edith wharton

Buy my books!

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So I organized my books last Saturday.

It was a lot more work than I thought it would be, as it seems I have accumulated far more books than I thought I had over the course of many, many years. And it was well into the fourth hour of my clean-up — I kid you not, it took literal hours to do this thing — that I realized I only had a limited amount of space in the apartment I share with the rest of my family.

There really was really only one thing left for me to do: Sell my books.

Continue reading Buy my books!

Your week in books#33

Watch thinking man’s porn star Stoya have an orgasm while reading Supervert’s “Necrophilia Variations”

  • I’ve been so remiss about blogging lately, that I haven’t told you guys about the great big Filipino Readercon happening at the Filipinas Heritage Library tomorrow. I’ll be there; you guys should check it out as well! (Source)
  • Jeffrey Eugenides and Junot Diaz do some historical cosplay for a Vogue spread on Edith Wharton. (Source)
  • I’m not really familiar with DC Pierson’s work, but he sure showed ” ? Idiot America ~ ???????x ?” that it’s a bad idea to outsource your summer reading to the internet. (Source)

  • The Guardian has an article compiling 20 irrefutable theories of book cover design. One of them involves kittens. (Source)
  • I haven’t read Yann Martel’s “Life of Pi” yet, but I’m sure a lot of you guys have. If you’re in the vicinity of the New York film festival, Ang Lee’s movie adaptation of the book is set to open it. (Source)
  • And since we’re “in” New York, here’s a cute little thing about New York bookstores from the New York Times. Say New York one more time. New York. (Source)
  • Self-publishing is all the rage these days, especially after E.L. James and Amanda Hocking, so the New York Times has compiled a handy list of the advantages and disadvantages that come with doing it your way. (Source)
  • Former reality show star and New York Times bestselling author *sigh* Lauren Conrad got a lot of people riled up after she put up a video on her Youtube channel of her slicing up copies of Lemony Snicket’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events” for a craft project. She’s since taken the video down, but on the internet, everything lives forever. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3)
  • What does Lemony Snicket have to say about all this then? I quote:

“It has always been my belief that people who spend too much time with my work end up as lost souls, drained of reason, who lead lives of raving emptiness and occasional lunatic violence. What a relief it is to see this documented.”

Ouch. (Source)

  • Finally, Out Magazine has an interview with Stephen Chbosky, Ezra Miller, Logan Lerman, and Johnny Simmons regarding the big screen adaptation of Chbosky’s “The Perks of Being A Wallflower”. Ezra Miller comes out as queer in it, if any one of you is interested. Because I know I am. (Source)

And don’t even front that you don’t want to see the photos, which you can find under the cut.

Continue reading Your week in books#33

Book review: Jullie Yap Daza’s “Mistresses Play . . . Men Stray . . . The Wives Stay”

Alright guys, since I’ve had NO internet connection for about two days now — THANKS PLDT — this post will be coming to you from the patchy internet connection of my prepaid internet USB thingie.

Way before Candace Bushnell began writing about the highs and lows of having a relationship in the Big Apple with “Sex and the City”, journalist Jullie Yap Daza was already chronicling the affairs – pun intended – of the Filipino heart.

First published in 1992, “Etiquette for Mistresses and What Wives Can Learn From Them” became a runaway bestseller, going into several editions and now – a decade later – spawning a sequel.

Titled “Mistresses Play…Men Stray…The Wives Stay”, the new book tells even more tales of philandering husbands and the women who suffer them. But with several years having passed since the last installment, do Jullie Yap Daza’s tales of the unfaithful city still hold as much sway as they used to?

Continue reading Book review: Jullie Yap Daza’s “Mistresses Play . . . Men Stray . . . The Wives Stay”

The second time around

Conventional wisdom tells you that you should never judge a book by its cover, but what I’ve found to be true for me is that you should never judge a book on your first read. As I’ve grown up to the ripe old age of twentysomething, I’ve discovered that a lot of the books that I despised as a child ended up as being some of my favorites.

Surprisingly, a lot of the books that I did not want to read were the ones hoisted on me in high school. It’s not like I wasn’t up for a challenge — I got to about a quarter of “The Odyssey” before the end of summer vacation cut my reading short — but it was because some teachers just have a knack for taking the fun out of reading.

When before I could take my time with a book, savor the language and the world building and pretty much imagine myself in the story, I had to read these assigned books with a joyless focus, worrying about which character, utterance, or random detail would pop up in tests. If there was ever a time when I was thisclose to hating reading and books, it was during high school.

Back then, if we were given a choice to pick a book to read and be quizzed on, I would always consult with upperclassmen before making a decision. That was how I ended up picking J.D. Salinger over Edith Wharton — an overwhelming number of the seniors that I knew told me that it was the better read.

Salinger and Wharton and everything in between