Tag Archives: google+

Your week in books#16

  • We all know that we have our very own Hobbit House here in the good ol’ Philippine Islands, but apparently Montana is also getting in on that sweet Hobbit action. Steve Michaels of Montana runs an inn with “a four-foot stump-shaped troll house, a few round-door hobbit houses with chimney pipes and several shoe-box-size fairy houses.” (Source)
  • Back when I was a prepubescent, I tried reading Stephen King’s “The Stand” and unfortunately couldn’t even make it past a quarter of it. I guess I should start looking for a copy and give it another try as David Yates and Steve Kloves (ugh) are coming up with an adaptation. (Source)
  • Anybody who followed the London riots know that the bookstore Waterstone wasn’t touched by any of the looters. The Guardian has an essay up that asks: “Was it because the looters were uneducated, or because today’s publishing industry isn’t putting out books and materials that they can relate to?” (Source)
  • The Guardian also has a great list of writing tips from several writers. I personally think Margaret Atwood’s tip are the best. (Source)
  • Hate spoilers? Science Daily says you should suck it up because spoilers don’t really…uhm…spoil the story. (Source)
  • The Google Books blog has tips on how you can share your books finds on Google+. (Source)
  • Finally, OH MY GOD, FINALLY, we come to the best part of this week’s round-up. Back in May 2010, Tyra Banks announced that she would come out with a trilogy (trilogy!) of books set in Modelland (pronounced Model-land) which is described as a place where “where ‘Intoxibellas’ are trained. Intoxibellas are drop-dead beautiful, kick-butt fierce and, yeah, maybe they have some powers too“. Well, it’s been more than a year, and Barnes and Noble just put out a sample chapter of Tyra’s book. We have characters named Tookie de la Creme (TOOKIE!), Myrracle de la Creme (MYRRACLE!!), Theophilus Lovelaces (If that is not a rip-off of Xenophilius Lovegood I will strangle myself with an umbilical cord), and Zarpessa Zarionneaux. IT’S GLORIOUS. (Source)

Your week in books #10

  • If the people on my Twitter feed are to be believed, the biggest news of the day is the death of the Oxford comma. My response is to quote The Shoebox Project:

“Good advice though it may be, I am choosing to ignore all of it, since I have created a personal grammar that adheres to my needs both moral and punctuational. After all, with the world in its current lamentable state, I sincerely believe that rather than WASTING commas with the rest of my fat capitalist pig brothers on frivolous consumerist sentences like these, they should be donated to the more needy, such as the chinese, who as I understand it have NO COMMAS AT ALL.”

  • Another big development online has been the quiet launch of Google+, the search engine giant’s attempt to dislodge Facebook from its social networking throne. While my initial wanderings on it have just made me realize it is Facebook without the annoying apps, Galleycat has been much more productive and outlined a few ways that the new Google product can be useful to writers, readers, and publishers. (Source)
  • The Guardian has a list of phrases that should be considered cliche and meaningless, at least according to poets participating in the Ledbury Poetry Festival. Great, as I wasn’t worried enough about which phrases to use to not sound like some cliche-spewing robot. (Source)
  • Finally, plagiarism! While not on the scale of Kaavya Viswanathan — Viswanathan’s book actually got published — there has apparently been a plagiarist on the loose on the wilds of the Internet. Somebody named Angela Priest has been taking published work, changing the character names, and passing them off as her own work. She’s not earning any money from it, but that is still some messed-up shit. The “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” background isn’t helping her out either. (Source 1, Source 2)