Tag Archives: graphic novels

Your week in books#34

  • All of the cool kids have blogged about it already, so let me just add that I had a great time at the Filipino ReaderCon last week! Our “Fifty Shades of Grey” discussion went well, thank God, and it was nice to see so many readers in one place!
  • The National Book Development Board also released their latest survey on the state of reading in the country. I haven’t perused it yet, but will be writing about it for the paper! (Source)
  • National Book Store is bringing Canada-based Filipino writer Jennifer Hillier here to the country! She’s set to do a talk and a book singing at the Powerbooks at Greenbelt 4. (Source)
  • A long, long time ago, when I wrote a review about “I Am Number Four“, I linked to an article from the New Yorker about James Frey’s “fiction factory”. However, it would seem that “The Rise of Nine” is no longer following that particular model. (Source)

  • Anyone who knows me knows that I love me some “The Lord of the Rings”. And that I also love me a lot of other authors. What better way to ring those two things together than with alternative author’s versions of “The Lord of the Rings”? I particularly liked the D. H. Lawrence one. (Source)
  • io9 has some really great samples from Scott Westerfeld and Keith Thompson’s “Manual of Aeronautics”! I am still waiting with bated breath for a copy to show up at my local National Book Store. (Source)
  • In case you guys didn’t know, Superman and Wonder Woman are now officially a couple. I thought they were already doing it before! (Source)
  • While I still haven’t gotten around to reading “Catching Fire”, I do know that Finnick Odair gets all the ladies and the boys who like boys all hot under the collar and stuff. And I do have to say that Sam Claflin — who has just been cast as Odair in the movie adaptation — is certainly doing that for me. What do you guys think? Pictures under the cut!

Continue reading Your week in books#34

“Trese” and “Elmer” giveaways!

I was supposed to put this up during Free Comic Book Day, but due to my being an incorrigible scatterbrain I promptly forgot all about doing so.

BUT! I have now remembered, and I am inviting one and all to participate while I give away these signed copies of Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo’s “Trese” as well as Gerry Alanguilan’s “Elmer”!

Let me quote myself from a few months ago:

“What do you guys have to do then? Since this is my first second fourth time doing this sort of thing, I thought it would be wise to pattern the process after young adult author Michelle Zink‘s own contest rules.

All you guys have to do is to post a link to this post on your preferred social network, then leave a comment on this very same post with a link to your post featuring the link. I sincerely hope that that horrible string of words has not discouraged you guys from joining yet. Doing so will get you ONE entry.

However, if you want a bigger chance at winning, you get ONE more entry for every person that you convince to follow me on Twitter (@tristantrakand) or read this blog. The person you refer also gets ONE entry, just as long as they tell me on Twitter or in the comments section of this post who referred them.

Your comment tallying the number of entries you have should look like this:

  • Posted link (on preferred social network) = 1 entry
  • Referred (x) number of people = (x) entry/entries

Unfortunately, this contest is only for readers here in the Philippines, as I can’t yet afford to ship stuff halfway around the world. Third World living, y’all!”

I’ll be using Random.org to pick out the winners for this giveaway. The top name on the list gets gerry Alanguilan’s “Elmer”, while the next two gets Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo’s “Trese”

Contest runs until June 1, 2012. Winners will be announced around June 3. Good luck!

 

Book review: Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung’s “Young Avengers”

Although it may not look like it from most of the books that end up being reviewed on this blog, I was very much a comic book kid. I had my own comic book childhood — cut tragically short by my father — and have just recently tried to rekindle that old love once again.

One great thing about getting back into comics at this point in time is the fact that there are a bit more characters that I can relate to among the current (Marvel) line-up.  If my young gay self only had fierce goddesses like Storm and Phoenix to worship back in the day, there’s a slightly longer list of superheroes that are much more relatable to a gay man such as myself.

PERFECTION. Illustration by Emanuela Lupacchino

There’s Northstar, who’s the first openly gay superhero in American comic books and apparently set to become the first to enter into a gay marriage in the upcoming Astonishing X-Men #51.

There’s Rictor and Shatterstar, who shared the first ever same-sex kiss in a mainstream Marvel title, and whose subtext runs for as long as 20 years. I’d buy X-Force, but I don’t think I can (literally) afford to wade through all of that.

And let’s not forget the fact that most people with brains generally consider the mutants of the Marval universe as a metaphor for how the LGBT community is discriminated against in the real world.

It’s for all of those reasons — as well as the constant squeeing of Wiccan and Hulkling fans — that I happily picked up a copy of the Young Avengers Ultimate Collection. Will the buzz around this title be justified? Or will it just be a big disappointment?

(Edited to add Wiccan/Hulkling fanart!)

Continue reading Book review: Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung’s “Young Avengers”

Your weeks in books#31

It’s been a while since we’ve had one of these things!

  • Of course, the biggest thing happening in the country this March — at least for fans of YA — is the upcoming visit by bestselling author Lauren Oliver. She’ll be signing books at the Powerbooks at Greenbelt 4 on March 25, 3 p.m. And, five fans may even get to have lunch with her! Details are over at National Book Store’s Facebook page. (Source)
  • Lauren Oliver isn’t the only person that National Book Store is bringing over! As reported by Comic Book Resources, Mark Millar will also be visiting the country in May! (Source)
  • The University of the Philippines is also holding a month-long book sale in celebration of its 47th anniversary! All UP Press titles, bestsellers, and new releases will be sold at a 20 percent discount, and all consigned titles at a 5 percent discount. The book sale runs from March 1 – 31, 2012. The UP Press bookstore is located at E. de los Santos Street, UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City and is open from Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 12:00 noon and 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.
  • A book blog by the Guardian ponders on what effect the increasing popularity of book trailers has on the books themselves. (Source)
  • Batman is named the greatest comic book hero. Of the top 10 heroes listed, Wonder Woman is the only…woman. (Source)
  • After facing protests from a group called “One Million Moms”, Life with Archie #16 — featuring the interracial gay marriage of character Kevin Keller — flies off the bookshelves. (Source)
  • The New York Times has a really interesting story on The Physical Archive of the Internet Arhive, which seeks to “collect one copy of every book.” (Source)

Book review: Carlo Vergara’s “Zsazsa Zaturnnah sa Kalakhang Maynila”

I don’t remember how I first heard about “Ang Kagilagilalas na Pakikipagsapalaran ni Zsazsa Zaturnnah”, but I do know that the moment I laid hands on it I couldn’t put it down.

I read comic books alongside more “serious” material, and one thing I always found lacking in both were characters that my young homosexual self could relate to. The closest character I could latch on to was Storm, because that girl is fierce.

MAHOGANY 2012

So to see the main character in a comic book be a gay man and a hilarious woman? It was like the Powers-That-Be thought it was about time my childhood was redeemed.

And it seemed like I wasn’t the only one who thought so! Not only did “Ang Kagilagilalas na Pakikipagsapalaran ni Zsazsa Zaturnnah” get turned into a movie (see above clip) and a blockbuster musical, it won its creator Carlo Vergara the National Book Award in 2003. It was just so great for me to see a comic book with a gay sensibility achieve not just mainstream success but also critical acclaim as well.

It’s been a decade since then, and only now has Carlo Vergara come out with “Zsazsa Zaturnnah sa Kalakhang Maynila”, the long awaited sequel to his blockbuster work. Will it live up to the standards set by the first book? Or will I just be bitterly disappointed?

Continue reading Book review: Carlo Vergara’s “Zsazsa Zaturnnah sa Kalakhang Maynila”

Your week in books#30

  • When I was a lot younger, I was really into the film “Snow Falling On Cedars”, so much so that I had to cut back on my obsessive buying of buttered corn (Don’t ask.) just so I could save up to buy a copy of the book. More than a decade later (!), I still haven’t gotten around to reading the book, and David Guterson has won the Literary Review’s “Bad Sex in Fiction” award. (Source)
  • Should I be worried that Amazon has acquired Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books? (Source)
  • Aside from buying Marshall Cavendish, Amazon is also investing $6 million dollars for the authors who participate in its Kindle Lending Library. (Source)
  • I have to admit that as of late, my resistance to ebooks and ebook readers has been slowly but surely deteriorating. I’ve been eyeing the Kindle Fire for a while now, and if I get my finances in order — probably sometime the next millennium — I may actually get one. So what to do when even diehard “solid book” fans like myself are considering changing sides? Publishers seem to have decided that making books prettier is the answer. (Source)

 

Jane Austen?
  • That painting over there is supposedly Jane Austen, author of “Pride and Prejudice”, “Sense and Sensibility”, and “Emma”. Certainly looks better than the other famous Jane Austen portrait, where she looks like she just noticed someone farted in the drawing room. (Source)
  • In England, poet laureate Ted Hughes — who most people probably know more as Sylvia Plath’s husband — is being honored with a slab at Westminster Abbey. (Source)
  • I was introduced to the works of Kurt Vonnegut by Taylor Hanson (Don’t ask.), and I’ve loved his works ever since. Even the new biography that paints him as a bitter, angry man with a temper isn’t going to change that. (Source)
  • FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT. Here’s what “Watchmen”, “V for Vendetta” and “Lost Girls” creator Alan Moore has to say about “300” author Frank Miller (TEAM ALAN MOORE!) (Source):

“Frank Miller is someone whose work I’ve barely looked at for the past 20 years. I thought the Sin City stuff was unreconstructed misogyny; 300 [a 1998 comic book series] appeared to be wildly ahistoric, homophobic and just completely misguided. I think that there has probably been a rather unpleasant sensibility apparent in Frank Miller’s work for quite a long time.”

Your week in books#26

  • Here’s the trailer for “Snow White and the Huntsman”, where Bella Swan, after being trained by Thor, leads the Men of Gondor in a rebellion against Aeon Flux. or Aileen Wuornos if you’re all indie and stuff.
  • Two Pulitzer Prize winners will be heading to our fair shores next week! Edward P. Jones, author of “The Known World“, and Junot Diaz, author of “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao“, will be taking part in the Manila International Literary Festival, which will be held from November 16 to 18. (Source)
  • There’s going to be a course on Harry Potter at Durham University in the United Kingdom. The Guardian’s kicker takes the cake, though: “Module will focus on ‘social, cultural and educational context’, but no word on whether Expelliarmus will be applied to students with poor grades.” (Source)
  • I love a good plagiarism story, and boy is this one crazy. Debut novelist Q. R.
    Q. R. Markham, plagiarist

    Markham’s novel, “Assassin of Secrets”, recently came out to strong reviews, with Publishers Weekly noting that the “obvious Fleming influence just adds to the appeal. Turns out, the “obvious Fleming influence” was around because Markham — Quentin Rowan in real life — used Fleming’s actual words, along with the word of Robert Ludlum and many more. The blog “Reluctant Habits” even provides a rundown of the works plagiarized! (Source 1, Source 2)

  • “Assassin of Secrets” most definitely will not make it to Amazon’s Best Book of 2011. Haruki Murakami’s “1Q84” and Erin Morgenstern’s “The Night Circus” made it though! (Source)
  • The New York Observer has a nice profile on Anthony Bourdain, who it appears is now going into publishing. (Source)
  • Barnes and Noble has a new Nook tablet out! (Source)
  • Check out “The Books They Gave Me”, a Tumblr blog focusing on books given by lovers. (Source)
  • Take a look at some stills from the David Cronenberg film, “Cosmopolis”, based on the Don Delilio novel of the same name. It stars Robert Pattinson! (Source)
  • In that other Robert Pattinson film that’s based on a book, he talks about how Bella’s placenta tastes like “cream cheese and strawberry jam”. I can’t wait to watch this movie. (Source)
  • Finally, “One Tree Hill” star Chad Michael Murray is now a graphic novelist, coming out with “Everlast” under Archaia. I will now take this opportunity to post shirtless pictures of him under the cut. (Source)

Continue reading Your week in books#26

Parting Shot#2: iWant

That's a big smudge right there...

iWent to the “Trese 4” book launch yesterday, and aside from meeting friends old and new, iAlso got a chance to look at this pretty baby up close. Hand drawn by “Trese” artist Kajo Baldisimo, it’s the prize up for grabs for those who grab a copy of the latest installment of “Trese”. iAm thinking of another i(Word) gag to insert here but iAm coming up short.

Your week in books#20

  • Any Jonathan Safran Foer fans? Here’s the trailer for the movie adaptation of his second novel, “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close”. I liked the book, even if some parts were a little gimmicky, but this trailer kind of looks “meh” to me.
  • Other big news over the week: Amazon’s announcement regarding its new line of Kindle devices. Any of you interested in getting either the eInk Kindle, the Kindle Touch, the Kindle Touch 3G or the $199 Kindle Fire tablet? (Source 1, Source 2)
  • I used to read “Asterix” comics when I was a little Bosconian. Today I found out that I am old enough to remember when both of the creators of “Asterix” were still around. (Source)
  • Guy steals Kingsley Amis, James Joyce, and T.S. Eliot manuscripts to get psychological help in prison. I’d say mission accomplished. Or something (Source)
  • Over the past week, one thing that got the comic book blogs buzzing was the reboots of Starfire and Catwoman from the DC comics universe. Several fans objected to the objectification (no pun intended) both the female characters underwent in their reboots. As I am not a regular DC reader, would anyone care to comment if the objections do have merit? Because from what I’ve seen it really seems that they do. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3, Source 4)
  • Finally, under the cut you’ll find some of the character posters from the new “The Three Musketeers” adaptation.

Continue reading Your week in books#20

Your week in books#15

  • Marvel introduces a half-Black, half-Latino Spider-Man, floats the idea that we may even have a gay Spider-Man one day. The usual suspects react like totally racist jerkwads. Meanwhile, all of this happened in the Ultimates universe, which does not affect actual Marvel continuity. Call me when Parker actually kicks the bucket. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3)
  • Remember the “Paradise Lost” movie I mentioned a few weeks ago? Word is that Meryll Streep’s son-in-law, Benjamin Walker will be playing the role of Archangel Michael. I still think this is a horrible idea, but if Walker and Bradley Cooper battle it out shirtless, I may be persuaded.
  • Finally, check out these sketches Wendy Macnaughton did for the New York Times! (Source)