Tag Archives: harry potter

Your week in books#21

I'm way too fat for this shirt but I want one.
  • Check out the set of literature inspired tees being sold over at Out of Print Clothing! I especially liked the “Lolita”, “A Clockwork Orange”, and “The Master and Margerita” ones! (Source)
  • Potter fans looking to get themselves ebook copies of all the seven books will probably have to wait for a little while longer as the people behind it reveal that problems at Pottermore have delayed the initial October release. (Source)
  • Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer has won the 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature — and he’s playing the piano during the event as well. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • The Guardian has an interview with Maurice Sendak that basically reveals the children’s book author has a way with insults. Here’s a sampling:

“Ebooks: ‘I hate them. It’s like making believe there’s another kind of sex. There isn’t another kind of sex. There isn’t another kind of book! A book is a book is a book.’

Of Salman Rushdie, who once gave him a terrible review in the New York Times, he says: ‘That flaccid fuckhead. He was detestable. I called up the Ayatollah, nobody knows that.’

Gwyneth Paltrow: ‘I can’t stand her.’   

  • Just in case you haven’t had enough of the vampire novels aimed for young adults (YA), Holly Black has announced that she is coming out with a vampire novel titled “The Coldest Girl in Coldtown”. (Source)
He's a librarian with tattoos. MY HEART.
  • Finally, is any one of you interested in perusing a calendar featuring librarians in various states of undress? I don’t know about you guys, but I am down for this. Sexual orientation is mostly indeterminate, so score another point for me! (Source 1, Source 2)

Your week in books #13

With the San Diego Comic Con now ongoing, there is a lot of book to movie news now making it out into the Web.  From “Harry Potter” to “The Hunger Games” and all the way to the seemingly endless comic book adaptations, this week’s round-up will try to keep up with everything that’s happening, alongside other less “star-studded” book news.

  • With “Harry Potter” no longer a contender, Moviefone has put together a great list of book to movie projects that could possibly succeed in replicating the success of “Harry Potter”. Of course, first on the list is Suzanne Collins’ “The Hunger Games”, which just recently put out a teaser poster featuring a blazing mockingjay badge. Other series that seem set to make the transition to the silver screen are Cassandra Clare’s “The Mortal Instruments” trilogy; Maggie Stiefvater’s “The Wolves of Mercy Falls”; and Veronica Roth’s “Divergent”. (Source)
  • One book to movie franchise that has consistently dominated — for better or for worse, depending on who you’re asking — Comic Con has been Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” series, and this year is no different. According to Entertainment Weekly, some fans were in line for the Hall H press conference three days before it was set to start. Say what you will about the franchise, but goodness me that is a different level of adulation. Or crazy. All I know for sure is this is one chagrined looking Edward Cullen. (Source)

  • “Twilight” fans looking for a little bit of karmic payback for this particular Stephen King quote may have just had their wishes fulfilled as the adaptation of King’s “The Dark Tower” series looks to be dead before it even began. (Source)
  • “Captain America” is opening on our fair shores next week, and from the
    Let's all be honest now. You'd watch it just for this.

    advance buzz it looks like plunking a few hundred pesos for it won’t be such a bad life decision after at all. And at least it gives me a better reason to watch the movie other than getting to see Chris Evans shirtless. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3)

  • And just to keep us on the Captain America track for a bit longer, Marvel has just released two concept art posters for the “Avengers” movie coming out in 2012. (Source)
  • I quite enjoyed the “Sin City” movie when it came out in 2005, so I’m looking forward to the possibility of a sequel being made by Robert Rodriguez, who also helmed the first movie all those years ago. (Source)
  • Bradley Cooper is set to play Satan in a movie adaptation of the John Milton classic, “Paradise Lost“. I don’t know about you guys, but this just sounds like a disaster waiting to happen. (Source)
  • Just when you thought Google couldn’t get any more omnipresent than it already is, the search engine giant just announced that it will be integrating with Pottermore so that future ebooks of the “Harry Potter” series will be able to integrate seamlessly with all the other Google products already on offer. (Source)
  • There’s a great essay in the New York Times about how the digitization of historical texts and artifacts means for historians and researchers used to feeling a “contact high” when handling original manuscripts. Is there really any difference between handling an original manuscript and perusing it electronically? (Source)
  • Finally, Jodi Picoult, author of “My Sister’s Keeper”, is set to publish a book she co-wrote with her daughter, entitled “Between the Lines”. (Source)

Your week in books #12

It’s been a busy week for me since the “Deathly Hallows” premiere, with interviews left and right as well as a few hectic days at the office as well. Nothing to complain about, but it hasn’t really been making it easy for me to take off a few books from my “to-read” pile. Hopefully, I can blog about a couple of books by next week.

In the meantime, enjoy this week’s selection of book news!

  • With “Harry Potter” over for the time being — there’s still Pottermore, after all — people are looking to J.K. Rowling and what she has in store for the rest of the world. Rowling isn’t say much, though, other than that she is “working hard” on it. Here’s to hoping that she doesn’t end up like A.A. Milne. (Source)
  • There’s an interesting post over at Jezebel about the women in the Harry Potter universe, how empowered most of them are, and a little bit of speculation about what it could mean for future YA franchises in books and movies. There’s also a lot of healthy and interesting discussion in the comments section, so be sure to check it out! (Source)
  • To be quite honest, I have no idea what exactly Digital Adaptations is all about, and the interview with its executive producer over at Kotaku hasn’t exactly made things clearer for me either. From what I can understand, they’re adapting books to look a little like Microsoft Encarta’s Mindmaze and a little like those Flash games where you look for stuff hidden in backgrounds. I don’t know if that’s going to be terribly exciting, but I’m willing to see what they come up with. (Source)
  • Oxford University shelled out $1.6 million for 68-pages of an unfinished Jane Austen manuscript. It was supposed to be 80 pages, but the first 12 pages are already owned by the Morgan Library and Museum in New York. (Source, Source)
  • My birthday is in a few months, so would anybody be interested in gifting me with the pretty little book you can see on the right? It sounds like a lot of fun. I quote:

“The Elements of Style was first published in 1918. Think about that for a moment. In 1918, gay meant happy, opium derivatives were prescribed for headaches, and top hats and monocles were un-ironic fashion choices.”

  • Finally, trailers for upcoming book to movie adaptations. The first one is Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo“, an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s Caldecott-winning novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret“. Young stars Asa Butterfield and Chloe Moretz will be acting alongside Ben Kingsley, Christopher Lee, and Helen McCrory.

 

I haven’t read the book, so I don’t know how faithful it is. Looks interesting!

  • This second one is for “John Carter“, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs “A Princess of Mars“. It stars Taylor Kitsch, which is all the reason I need, frankly. But to find out that the script is by Michael Chabon? Michael “The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay” Chabon? I WILL BE FIRST IN LINE.

 

Will I pay P300 to see Taylor Kitsch in various states of undress? You bet.

Book to movie review: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”

Guuurrrlll.

So last night I was at the press preview for “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”, which I think everyone and their uncle knows by now is the final (FINAL!) installment of a film series that has lasted a decade and earned Warner Bros $6 billion dollars.

Much like any normal fan that grew up with the books, I was pretty excited and actually expected to be quite emotional at this event. After all, the books have been with me for almost 15 years, while the movies have been a mainstay in my movie viewing schedule for almost a decade.

I have actually been liking the movies more and more over the years, and I thought that as they were increasing in quality, the ultimate film in the octet would be the best in the lot. Maybe that was the most crucial mistake on my part.

Because I thought the movie was…well…kind of a fail not as good as I wanted it to be.

Continue reading Book to movie review: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”

Your week in books #11

First off, apologies for the lack of updates for the past week. Not only am I busy at my day job, I am currently slogging my way through a thousand-page work which I cannot talk about here because of legal considerations. DUN-DUN-DUN!

I will hopefully be able to finish this book over the weekend and move on to other works that I can feature on the blog. But for the meantime, enjoy this week’s round-up of news!

  • With “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2” arriving in theaters next week, the Boy Who Lived is what is hogging the headlines right now. Newspapers from both sides of the pond are looking back at a decade of Potter, with varying opinions on whether J.K. Rowling’s hold on popular culture has been a boon or a bane for us all. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Another fantasy series is also in the news, and it is George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire”. It’s sixth book, “A Dance with Dragons”, has just been accidentally shipped to over a hundred readers in Germany. To say that Martin is pissed is an understatement; he says he will “mount the head on a spike” of the Amazon employee who made the costly mistake. (Source)
  • I rarely buy my books online — I like going to bookstores — but I do know that a monopoly in the book selling business will not be good for readers or my pockets. So just like fellow book blogger Honey, I would prefer that Amazon and The Book Depository to be separate entities. (Source)
  • It seems like J.D. Salinger’s letters are just popping up everywhere. A new batch has been discovered that reveals that the author of “The Catcher in the Rye” and “Franny and Zooey” found graduations “pretentious” and that he had a deep love for cats. (Source)
  • Finally, here’s an interesting idea. Twenty-six crime authors — from Alexander McCall Smith to RL Stine — have collaborated to come up with “No Rest for the Dead”. Each of the authors were just provided an outline of the chapter they were going to write and pretty much nothing else. (Source)

Your week in books #9

  • Of course, the big news of the day is J.K. Rowling’s announcement regarding Pottermore. Rather than a Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Game (MMORPG) or an online game as some newspapers announced, the website is just a little bit more. Not only will it be the only place to get your ebook versions of the novels, it will also have interactive features and additional information about the books, characters, and the story, provided by Rowling herself. I personally just want to know which house I’ll be sorted in.  (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Spider-Man is dead! SPIDER-MAN IS DEAD! WHATEVER SHALL WE DO NOW?!? Oh wait, it happens in the Ultimates universe, so it basically affects nothing. Nothing at all. (Source)
  • The New York Times has an interesting piece on Eva Gabrielsson, Stieg Larsson’s partner for more than three decades. I am particularly interested in the Viking curse ritual. (Source)
  • Lastly, NPR has a really touching story on Alice Ozma and Jim Brozina, a father and daughter pair who kept up a tradition of reading together every night for nine years. (Source)

Book review: Cassandra Clare’s “City of Fallen Angels”

Anyone who’s been in Harry Potter fandom for as long as I have has certainly heard of the infamous Cassandra Clare. Bringing her up is always fun because people have such extreme feelings when it comes to her — either rabid hate or blind obedience. There is no gray area when it comes to Clare. For me, the whole debacle and the way she handled it has always made me skeptical of everything that she has put out.

That plagiarism debacle, however, certainly didn’t end Clare’s writing career. In 2007, she came out with “City of Bones”, a book that would jumpstart her successful “The Mortal Instruments” series. She’s been on the top of the New York Times (NYT) Bestseller List and as garnered praise from authors like Holly Black and Tamora Pierce.

Even “Clockwork Angel”, the first book in her new “Infernal Devices” series, shot up the NYT Bestseller List despite the mixed fan reaction, with most of the fans complaining that “Clockwork Angel” merely rehashed characters, plots, and themes Clare had already explored in her three previous books.

Her latest novel, “City of Fallen Angels”, is a return to the series that made her famous. The novel shifts its focus from Clary Fray to that of her best friend, Simon Lewis. Will this new novel be a return to form, or another clunky addition to a once soaring collection?

Continue reading Book review: Cassandra Clare’s “City of Fallen Angels”