Tag Archives: jane austen

Buy my books!

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So I organized my books last Saturday.

It was a lot more work than I thought it would be, as it seems I have accumulated far more books than I thought I had over the course of many, many years. And it was well into the fourth hour of my clean-up — I kid you not, it took literal hours to do this thing — that I realized I only had a limited amount of space in the apartment I share with the rest of my family.

There really was really only one thing left for me to do: Sell my books.

Continue reading Buy my books!

My post-MIBF report#1

Unless you were hiding under a rock for the past week or so, you’d have known that the country’s premiere event for bibliophiles, the Manila International Book Fair (MIBF), was going on at the SMX Convention Center at the SM Mall of Asia.

Just like all the years I’ve been to this shebang, it’s been an exhausting but incredibly fun few days at the MIBF. I didn’t buy as many books as I did in previous years, mostly because I was flitting around SMX and the metropolis attending various book-related happenings. Is that a good thing? My wallet says yes.

Whenever I actually had time to browse the shelves, it was usually to take pictures or to pick out books that my younger sister has been eyeing for herself. I actually only bought just one book for myself this year!

Continue reading My post-MIBF report#1

Ronreads interview: Lauren Oliver – Part 1

The crowd at Lauren Oliver’s book signing.

She’s touring Australia now, but for a few days last week, New York Times bestselling author Lauren Oliver was in the country stumping for her latest book, “Pandemonium”, the sequel to “Delirium”.

While her visit was short and sweet, Lauren Oliver was still able to squeeze in some time for an interview with yours truly, other media outlets, as well as with Ms. Xandra Ramos Padilla of National Book Store.

While I had my own time to interview Lauren, I also attended her interview with Ms. Xandra Ramos Padilla. For those who weren’t able to make it that day, I’m posting the full transcript of that interview under the cut. Tomorrow, I’ll put up the complete transcript of the interview I did with her.

Continue reading Ronreads interview: Lauren Oliver – Part 1

Book review: Jullie Yap Daza’s “Mistresses Play . . . Men Stray . . . The Wives Stay”

Alright guys, since I’ve had NO internet connection for about two days now — THANKS PLDT — this post will be coming to you from the patchy internet connection of my prepaid internet USB thingie.

Way before Candace Bushnell began writing about the highs and lows of having a relationship in the Big Apple with “Sex and the City”, journalist Jullie Yap Daza was already chronicling the affairs – pun intended – of the Filipino heart.

First published in 1992, “Etiquette for Mistresses and What Wives Can Learn From Them” became a runaway bestseller, going into several editions and now – a decade later – spawning a sequel.

Titled “Mistresses Play…Men Stray…The Wives Stay”, the new book tells even more tales of philandering husbands and the women who suffer them. But with several years having passed since the last installment, do Jullie Yap Daza’s tales of the unfaithful city still hold as much sway as they used to?

Continue reading Book review: Jullie Yap Daza’s “Mistresses Play . . . Men Stray . . . The Wives Stay”

Your week in books#30

  • When I was a lot younger, I was really into the film “Snow Falling On Cedars”, so much so that I had to cut back on my obsessive buying of buttered corn (Don’t ask.) just so I could save up to buy a copy of the book. More than a decade later (!), I still haven’t gotten around to reading the book, and David Guterson has won the Literary Review’s “Bad Sex in Fiction” award. (Source)
  • Should I be worried that Amazon has acquired Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books? (Source)
  • Aside from buying Marshall Cavendish, Amazon is also investing $6 million dollars for the authors who participate in its Kindle Lending Library. (Source)
  • I have to admit that as of late, my resistance to ebooks and ebook readers has been slowly but surely deteriorating. I’ve been eyeing the Kindle Fire for a while now, and if I get my finances in order — probably sometime the next millennium — I may actually get one. So what to do when even diehard “solid book” fans like myself are considering changing sides? Publishers seem to have decided that making books prettier is the answer. (Source)

 

Jane Austen?
  • That painting over there is supposedly Jane Austen, author of “Pride and Prejudice”, “Sense and Sensibility”, and “Emma”. Certainly looks better than the other famous Jane Austen portrait, where she looks like she just noticed someone farted in the drawing room. (Source)
  • In England, poet laureate Ted Hughes — who most people probably know more as Sylvia Plath’s husband — is being honored with a slab at Westminster Abbey. (Source)
  • I was introduced to the works of Kurt Vonnegut by Taylor Hanson (Don’t ask.), and I’ve loved his works ever since. Even the new biography that paints him as a bitter, angry man with a temper isn’t going to change that. (Source)
  • FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT. Here’s what “Watchmen”, “V for Vendetta” and “Lost Girls” creator Alan Moore has to say about “300” author Frank Miller (TEAM ALAN MOORE!) (Source):

“Frank Miller is someone whose work I’ve barely looked at for the past 20 years. I thought the Sin City stuff was unreconstructed misogyny; 300 [a 1998 comic book series] appeared to be wildly ahistoric, homophobic and just completely misguided. I think that there has probably been a rather unpleasant sensibility apparent in Frank Miller’s work for quite a long time.”

Your week in books#27

  • Just in case the theaters around the country haven’t made it clear to you guys already, “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” just opened yesterday. The lines to buy tickets were crazy.
  • Galleycat has an interview up with “Breaking Dawn” screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg. Favorite quote: “Don’t get pregnant with a demon baby unless you have vampire venom on hand.” (Source)
  • Check out the guys who lined up for the “Breaking Dawn” premiere. They’re exactly what you’d expect. (Source)
  • In “Akira-That-Is-Not Akira” news, it appears that Kristen Stewart is being tapped to play the role of Kei. Stab me with a rusty fork RIGHT. NOW. (Source)
  • Fact about myself: I did not like Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance series. I could barely make it past the halfway point with “Eragon”. The movie wasn’t any better either — woefully lacking in shirtless scenes. I don’t think Paolini’s recent declaration that his next series is going to be science fiction is going to be any better either. (Source)
Jane Austen being fab.
  • If crime writer Lindsay Ashford is to be believed, then homegirl Jane “J-Hizzle” Austen was the victim of some foul play. Apparently, Mr. Bingley did her in with some arsenic. (Source)
  • Finally, under the cut are individual character poster for “The Avengers”, which comes out in the United States in May 2012. No word yet as to when it’ll come around to our fair shores, but I’m willing to bet it’s going to be around the same time. (Source)

Continue reading Your week in books#27

My MIBF loot report#2

Things didn’t let up even during the last two days of the Manila International Book Fair (MIBF). Over the weekend, it seemed like I was still scurrying to and fro either attending talks or interviewing authors. If not that, I was scurrying off the the other end of the metropolis for an entirely different work obligation.

As such, I didn’t really get to check out as much of the other booths at the MIBF. I mostly just hovered at the National Book Store booth as they had some of the most noteworthy events — interviews with Alexander Yates, Samantha Sotto, and Rachel Ward! — and as a result got most of the books I bought there.

Continue reading My MIBF loot report#2

Your week in books #12

It’s been a busy week for me since the “Deathly Hallows” premiere, with interviews left and right as well as a few hectic days at the office as well. Nothing to complain about, but it hasn’t really been making it easy for me to take off a few books from my “to-read” pile. Hopefully, I can blog about a couple of books by next week.

In the meantime, enjoy this week’s selection of book news!

  • With “Harry Potter” over for the time being — there’s still Pottermore, after all — people are looking to J.K. Rowling and what she has in store for the rest of the world. Rowling isn’t say much, though, other than that she is “working hard” on it. Here’s to hoping that she doesn’t end up like A.A. Milne. (Source)
  • There’s an interesting post over at Jezebel about the women in the Harry Potter universe, how empowered most of them are, and a little bit of speculation about what it could mean for future YA franchises in books and movies. There’s also a lot of healthy and interesting discussion in the comments section, so be sure to check it out! (Source)
  • To be quite honest, I have no idea what exactly Digital Adaptations is all about, and the interview with its executive producer over at Kotaku hasn’t exactly made things clearer for me either. From what I can understand, they’re adapting books to look a little like Microsoft Encarta’s Mindmaze and a little like those Flash games where you look for stuff hidden in backgrounds. I don’t know if that’s going to be terribly exciting, but I’m willing to see what they come up with. (Source)
  • Oxford University shelled out $1.6 million for 68-pages of an unfinished Jane Austen manuscript. It was supposed to be 80 pages, but the first 12 pages are already owned by the Morgan Library and Museum in New York. (Source, Source)
  • My birthday is in a few months, so would anybody be interested in gifting me with the pretty little book you can see on the right? It sounds like a lot of fun. I quote:

“The Elements of Style was first published in 1918. Think about that for a moment. In 1918, gay meant happy, opium derivatives were prescribed for headaches, and top hats and monocles were un-ironic fashion choices.”

  • Finally, trailers for upcoming book to movie adaptations. The first one is Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo“, an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s Caldecott-winning novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret“. Young stars Asa Butterfield and Chloe Moretz will be acting alongside Ben Kingsley, Christopher Lee, and Helen McCrory.

 

I haven’t read the book, so I don’t know how faithful it is. Looks interesting!

  • This second one is for “John Carter“, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs “A Princess of Mars“. It stars Taylor Kitsch, which is all the reason I need, frankly. But to find out that the script is by Michael Chabon? Michael “The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay” Chabon? I WILL BE FIRST IN LINE.

 

Will I pay P300 to see Taylor Kitsch in various states of undress? You bet.