Tag Archives: jd salinger

Your week in books #11

First off, apologies for the lack of updates for the past week. Not only am I busy at my day job, I am currently slogging my way through a thousand-page work which I cannot talk about here because of legal considerations. DUN-DUN-DUN!

I will hopefully be able to finish this book over the weekend and move on to other works that I can feature on the blog. But for the meantime, enjoy this week’s round-up of news!

  • With “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2” arriving in theaters next week, the Boy Who Lived is what is hogging the headlines right now. Newspapers from both sides of the pond are looking back at a decade of Potter, with varying opinions on whether J.K. Rowling’s hold on popular culture has been a boon or a bane for us all. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Another fantasy series is also in the news, and it is George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire”. It’s sixth book, “A Dance with Dragons”, has just been accidentally shipped to over a hundred readers in Germany. To say that Martin is pissed is an understatement; he says he will “mount the head on a spike” of the Amazon employee who made the costly mistake. (Source)
  • I rarely buy my books online — I like going to bookstores — but I do know that a monopoly in the book selling business will not be good for readers or my pockets. So just like fellow book blogger Honey, I would prefer that Amazon and The Book Depository to be separate entities. (Source)
  • It seems like J.D. Salinger’s letters are just popping up everywhere. A new batch has been discovered that reveals that the author of “The Catcher in the Rye” and “Franny and Zooey” found graduations “pretentious” and that he had a deep love for cats. (Source)
  • Finally, here’s an interesting idea. Twenty-six crime authors — from Alexander McCall Smith to RL Stine — have collaborated to come up with “No Rest for the Dead”. Each of the authors were just provided an outline of the chapter they were going to write and pretty much nothing else. (Source)

Your week in books #5

  • Those dirty Georgian era publishers! Turns out that the book “The Works of the Earls of Rochester and Roscommon” — which ran to 20 editions — was so popular back in those days only partly because of the “serious” poetry within. An Oxford researcher has discovered that pubslihers bound at the back of the 1714 edition three poems centering on dildos. Sex still sells, in whatever era. (Source)
  • While 18th century men apparently suffered from “dildo envy”, it would appear that today’s male writers have nothing to worry about. A new study from the US reveals that leading literary magazines focus their review coverage on books written by men, and commission more men than women to write about them. (Source)
  • Check out this interesting story from The Paris Review about a 33-year-old J.D. Salinger asking a girl to drop everything in her life to be with him. (Source)
  • Everyone knows I’m not really a big fan of e-book readers, but it really does look like that is where reading is headed. The New York Times is saying that more and more younger readers are starting to get into these things. (Source)

Finally, check out this video on how to make your own interactive comic.

    Your week in books #3

    I’ve had a busy week, so apologies for not being able to put up your weekly installment of “Your Week in Books” yesterday. Here it is now!

    Vladmir Nabokov hunting butterflies in Switzerland
    • Aside from being the author of “Lolita“, Vladimir Nabokov was also an avid collector of butterflies. It appears that way back in 1945, he had come up with a hypothesis that a specific species of butterflies migrated from Asia to the New World, which professional lepidopterists dismissed. Turns out he was right, after all. (Source)
    • The University of East Anglia (UEA) has been given 50 letters written by J.D. Salinger to his friend Donald Hartog. The UEA website doesn’t say what exactly are in those letters, but Mediabistro says it reveals that Salinger liked Burger King and Tim Henman. Okay. (Source)
    • Haruki Murakami’s new novel, “1Q84”, will come out in October. Paul Bogaards is Knopf’s publicity director. (Source)
    • For those interested in how books get made, check out how the University of Iowa Libraries bound together a 10,000 page poetry book written by David Morice. (Source)

    I’m also hoping to finish “I Am Number Four” later today and have a review up by the evening, so watch out for that one!

    Your week in books

    Here’s what I hope will be a weekly roundup of book events and news happening all over the world.

    'Almost Perfect' seems like an interesting read.
    • THE NEWBERRY AWARDS were given out several days ago, with the prize going to debut novelist Clare Vanderpool for her work “Moon Over Manifest“. However, the book that caught my interest was Brian Katcher’s “Almost Perfect“, which won this year’s Stonewall’s Children and Young Adult Literature Award. It’s about a high school senior who finds himself attracted to someone transition from male to female, and I have to say that aside from Julie Ann Peters’ “Luna“, this is only the second YA book that I know of that deals with the subject. (Source)
    • “60 YEARS LATER: COMING THROUGH THE RYE” is actually going to be published and distributed. If you don’t know what that is, it’s that long-rumored sequel to “The Catcher In The Rye” that J.D. Salinger did not write. In it, a Holden Caulfield rip-off is now geriatric and escapes from a nursing home. I feel like this is going to be horrible…but I wouldn’t mind being given a copy. (Source)
    • Rooney Mara as Lisbeth Salander

      I have all the books in “The Millenium Trilogy“, and one day I will get down to reading all three of them. Someday I will also get around to watching the movie adaptations, but for the meantime I will enjoy looking at Rooney Mara as Lisbeth Salander in David Fincher’s adaptation of the books. (Source)

    • There might be a “Fight Club” musical. (Source)

    The second time around

    Conventional wisdom tells you that you should never judge a book by its cover, but what I’ve found to be true for me is that you should never judge a book on your first read. As I’ve grown up to the ripe old age of twentysomething, I’ve discovered that a lot of the books that I despised as a child ended up as being some of my favorites.

    Surprisingly, a lot of the books that I did not want to read were the ones hoisted on me in high school. It’s not like I wasn’t up for a challenge — I got to about a quarter of “The Odyssey” before the end of summer vacation cut my reading short — but it was because some teachers just have a knack for taking the fun out of reading.

    When before I could take my time with a book, savor the language and the world building and pretty much imagine myself in the story, I had to read these assigned books with a joyless focus, worrying about which character, utterance, or random detail would pop up in tests. If there was ever a time when I was thisclose to hating reading and books, it was during high school.

    Back then, if we were given a choice to pick a book to read and be quizzed on, I would always consult with upperclassmen before making a decision. That was how I ended up picking J.D. Salinger over Edith Wharton — an overwhelming number of the seniors that I knew told me that it was the better read.

    Salinger and Wharton and everything in between