Tag Archives: jk rowling

Your week in books#17

  • Here’s the trailer for Daniel Radcliffe’s newest movie, “The Woman In Black”. The movie is based on Susan Hill’s 1983 novel of the same name. This isn’t the first time that the novel has been adapted to another medium; there’s a 1987 theayer version by Nigel Kneale that is still being staged today.
  • Has anyone of my readers gotten their Pottermore email yet? Because my owl seems to have disappeared somewhere in the vastness of the internet. I am jealous of all the people who’ve already experienced what it’s like inside. Tidbits from The Guardian and Snitchseeker just ain’t cutting it anymore. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • And since we’re talking about the Snitchseeker anyway, I hope you guys know that they’re giving away a Hogwarts Acceptance Letter. They don’t usually ship the letter outside of the States, and the contest rules are ridiculously easy, so go ahead and test your luck! (Source)
  • The Register is reporting that the ebook versions of the “Harry Potter” series will be bundled with Sony’ newest e-readers. (Source)
  • Yet another Potter-related item: a print-on-demand group called PublishAmerica is threatening to sue J. K. Rowling for defamation, because she put out a press release denying that she had any relationship with group. Why’d she have to do that in the first place? Because PublishAmerica sent out a letter to its clients claiming that they could have J. K. Rowling comment on their books for a fee of $49. The whole story is over at the Writer Beware blog. (Source)
  • Today in book banning news: A Virginia school board has removed “A Study in Scarlet” from a sixth-grade reading list because a parent complained it was anti-Mormon. Not to worry — those kids can always download it from Project Gutenberg anyway. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Finally, National Book Store is bringing Nicholas Sparks to the country this October! Sparks will be in the country for a book signing tour, but so far that is the only detail that National Book Store has ironed out. I haven’t read a Nicholas Sparks novel ever (I know), but I will admit to crying while watching “A Walk to Remember”. I may have even perused some fanfic. (Source)

Your week in books #12

It’s been a busy week for me since the “Deathly Hallows” premiere, with interviews left and right as well as a few hectic days at the office as well. Nothing to complain about, but it hasn’t really been making it easy for me to take off a few books from my “to-read” pile. Hopefully, I can blog about a couple of books by next week.

In the meantime, enjoy this week’s selection of book news!

  • With “Harry Potter” over for the time being — there’s still Pottermore, after all — people are looking to J.K. Rowling and what she has in store for the rest of the world. Rowling isn’t say much, though, other than that she is “working hard” on it. Here’s to hoping that she doesn’t end up like A.A. Milne. (Source)
  • There’s an interesting post over at Jezebel about the women in the Harry Potter universe, how empowered most of them are, and a little bit of speculation about what it could mean for future YA franchises in books and movies. There’s also a lot of healthy and interesting discussion in the comments section, so be sure to check it out! (Source)
  • To be quite honest, I have no idea what exactly Digital Adaptations is all about, and the interview with its executive producer over at Kotaku hasn’t exactly made things clearer for me either. From what I can understand, they’re adapting books to look a little like Microsoft Encarta’s Mindmaze and a little like those Flash games where you look for stuff hidden in backgrounds. I don’t know if that’s going to be terribly exciting, but I’m willing to see what they come up with. (Source)
  • Oxford University shelled out $1.6 million for 68-pages of an unfinished Jane Austen manuscript. It was supposed to be 80 pages, but the first 12 pages are already owned by the Morgan Library and Museum in New York. (Source, Source)
  • My birthday is in a few months, so would anybody be interested in gifting me with the pretty little book you can see on the right? It sounds like a lot of fun. I quote:

“The Elements of Style was first published in 1918. Think about that for a moment. In 1918, gay meant happy, opium derivatives were prescribed for headaches, and top hats and monocles were un-ironic fashion choices.”

  • Finally, trailers for upcoming book to movie adaptations. The first one is Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo“, an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s Caldecott-winning novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret“. Young stars Asa Butterfield and Chloe Moretz will be acting alongside Ben Kingsley, Christopher Lee, and Helen McCrory.

 

I haven’t read the book, so I don’t know how faithful it is. Looks interesting!

  • This second one is for “John Carter“, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs “A Princess of Mars“. It stars Taylor Kitsch, which is all the reason I need, frankly. But to find out that the script is by Michael Chabon? Michael “The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay” Chabon? I WILL BE FIRST IN LINE.

 

Will I pay P300 to see Taylor Kitsch in various states of undress? You bet.

Your week in books #11

First off, apologies for the lack of updates for the past week. Not only am I busy at my day job, I am currently slogging my way through a thousand-page work which I cannot talk about here because of legal considerations. DUN-DUN-DUN!

I will hopefully be able to finish this book over the weekend and move on to other works that I can feature on the blog. But for the meantime, enjoy this week’s round-up of news!

  • With “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2” arriving in theaters next week, the Boy Who Lived is what is hogging the headlines right now. Newspapers from both sides of the pond are looking back at a decade of Potter, with varying opinions on whether J.K. Rowling’s hold on popular culture has been a boon or a bane for us all. (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Another fantasy series is also in the news, and it is George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire”. It’s sixth book, “A Dance with Dragons”, has just been accidentally shipped to over a hundred readers in Germany. To say that Martin is pissed is an understatement; he says he will “mount the head on a spike” of the Amazon employee who made the costly mistake. (Source)
  • I rarely buy my books online — I like going to bookstores — but I do know that a monopoly in the book selling business will not be good for readers or my pockets. So just like fellow book blogger Honey, I would prefer that Amazon and The Book Depository to be separate entities. (Source)
  • It seems like J.D. Salinger’s letters are just popping up everywhere. A new batch has been discovered that reveals that the author of “The Catcher in the Rye” and “Franny and Zooey” found graduations “pretentious” and that he had a deep love for cats. (Source)
  • Finally, here’s an interesting idea. Twenty-six crime authors — from Alexander McCall Smith to RL Stine — have collaborated to come up with “No Rest for the Dead”. Each of the authors were just provided an outline of the chapter they were going to write and pretty much nothing else. (Source)

Your week in books #9

  • Of course, the big news of the day is J.K. Rowling’s announcement regarding Pottermore. Rather than a Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Game (MMORPG) or an online game as some newspapers announced, the website is just a little bit more. Not only will it be the only place to get your ebook versions of the novels, it will also have interactive features and additional information about the books, characters, and the story, provided by Rowling herself. I personally just want to know which house I’ll be sorted in.  (Source 1, Source 2)
  • Spider-Man is dead! SPIDER-MAN IS DEAD! WHATEVER SHALL WE DO NOW?!? Oh wait, it happens in the Ultimates universe, so it basically affects nothing. Nothing at all. (Source)
  • The New York Times has an interesting piece on Eva Gabrielsson, Stieg Larsson’s partner for more than three decades. I am particularly interested in the Viking curse ritual. (Source)
  • Lastly, NPR has a really touching story on Alice Ozma and Jim Brozina, a father and daughter pair who kept up a tradition of reading together every night for nine years. (Source)

Your week in books #8

The return of the comeback! It’s been months since I last put up one of these, so I hope I can come up with some interesting stuff to present to you readers in bullet form.

  • Of course, this week’s big news is still the exhibit of the original manuscripts of Jose Rizal’s “Noli Me Tangere” and “El Filibusterismo” at the National Library of the Philippines. While I had originally blogged that the exhibit was only until today, the National Library has been ordered by the President himself to extend it up to Monday, June 20. So for those of you with an interest in history and our national hero, it’s best to check this exhibit out. The last time these works were exhibited to the general public was in the 60s, and you guys certainly don’t want to wait another 40 years to get to see these priceless historical relics.
  • What has been keeping the Internet abuzz, though, is J.K. Rowling’s announcement of her new project, Pottermore. All everybody has right now is just a website, though; Rowling says the big announcement will come maybe five days from now. Mark your calendars!
  • While some of my elementary school classmates grew up on Tintin, I grew up on a healthy diet of Funny komiks, Hardy Boys, Sweet Valley High, and Asterix comics. And as the cover on the right suggests, Asterix had quite a lot of violence in it. Probably because they had nothing better to do, a group of academics have analyzed the violence in these books in detail and published a study about in the European Journal of Neurosurgery, Acta Neurochirurgica. The results are just what you’d expect. (Source)

Book to movie EXTRAVAGANZA!

So last week, Summit Entertainment came out with its first trailer for Paul Anderson’s “The Three Musketeers IN 3D” (Emphasis mine) and it looks like a right mess. Slow motion musketeering (That is totally a legit word, shut up), Milla Jovovich’s Lady de Winter being all Alice from Resident Evil in the wrong era, and A FLYING SHIP. I mean, WAT EVEN.

If it weren’t for the fact that Orlando Bloom is in it, I wouldn’t even be mildly interested. I may watch it on October 14.

And as it turns out, it’s not the only book to movie adaptation coming out in the following months. Twelve book to movie adaptations are coming out this year, and I thought it would be fun to take a look at all of them and see which one is going to crush your book reading experience forever.
Continue reading Book to movie EXTRAVAGANZA!