Tag Archives: john green

Your week in books#40

Remember her from last week? There’s more on her

  • Just last week, Zoe “Zoella” Sugg was the name on everybody’s lips. Her debut novel, Girl Online, was the fastest selling hardback of 2014. A week later, she’s still on everybody’s lips, but for much less positive news. Both she and her publisher, Penguin, revealed that her book was ghostwritten for her by children’s author Siobhan Curham, and did it get her fans mad. It got so bad that Zoella had to take a break from the internet (!!!!), and The Guardian had to devote three articles to the whole controversy. (Source 1) (Source 2) (Source 3)
  • And since we’re in England anyway, check it out: J.K. Rowling’s Cormoran Stirke novels are going to be a BBC series! (Source)

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Author interview: Stephanie Perkins

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Stephanie Perkins with her fans during the Manila leg of her signing tour here in the country.

So, it’s been a while since this blog got updated. The reasons are perfectly valid, dear Reader Numbering in the Ones: there was that little issue of the hosting thingie that kept my blog up on the internets going kaput and erasing every post from October 2013 onwards, and then that typhoon that went through the country that plunged us INTO A SECOND DARKNESS.

But all that’s part of the past now. I’ve put up (sloppy) versions of the entries that disappeared into the ether, and our internet connection finally, finally came back a couple of days ago. And I suddenly have lots of free time.

This conversation with Stephanie Perkins happened weeks ago, but I still remember it so clearly because I don’t think I’ve talked to a visiting author who was as cheerful and enthusiastic as she was. Sure, Margaret Stohl, Melissa dela Cruz, and Alyson Noel were a barrel of laughs (I’d like you guys to the transcript, but I can’t find it anywhere now.), but there were three of them. Stephanie was all by herself! And she had some stomach problems to boot!

ANYWAY. Under the cut, Stephanie talks about growing up in a family of readers, her publication journey, and her writing process. Also, we fangirled for a bit about Francesca Lia Block.

Continue reading Author interview: Stephanie Perkins

Author interview: Jenny Han

Jenny Han with Town and Country editor-in-chief Yvette Fernandez, National Book Store's Xandra Ramos-Padilla, and Han's HUNDREDS of fans.
Jenny Han with Town and Country editor-in-chief Yvette Fernandez, National Book Store’s Xandra Ramos-Padilla, and Han’s HUNDREDS of fans.

I know, I know, this is like a bajillion years late, but it’s been a busy few weeks at the day job, what with restructuring and all that unsexy stuff that goes on with corporations. But it’s going up now!

I have to admit that I’ve long seen Jenny Han’s Summer series on bookstore shelves but never really had the urge to pick up a copy, mostly because I was very deeply into Margaret Stohl and Kami Garcia’s Beautiful Creatures series. I picked them up pretty quickly when I heard she was coming over, and even picked up her latest, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before.

And while I like the Summer books well enough, I absolutely loved To All The Boys I‘ve Loved Before. So I was really pumped to talk to her about it during this interview. Aside from that, we also got to touch on issues of diversity in YA (young adult) books, as well as whether one really needs an MFA to become a successful writer.

The full transcript under the cut!

Continue reading Author interview: Jenny Han

My post-MIBF report#1

Unless you were hiding under a rock for the past week or so, you’d have known that the country’s premiere event for bibliophiles, the Manila International Book Fair (MIBF), was going on at the SMX Convention Center at the SM Mall of Asia.

Just like all the years I’ve been to this shebang, it’s been an exhausting but incredibly fun few days at the MIBF. I didn’t buy as many books as I did in previous years, mostly because I was flitting around SMX and the metropolis attending various book-related happenings. Is that a good thing? My wallet says yes.

Whenever I actually had time to browse the shelves, it was usually to take pictures or to pick out books that my younger sister has been eyeing for herself. I actually only bought just one book for myself this year!

Continue reading My post-MIBF report#1

Ronreads interview: Lauren Oliver – Part 2

Yes, I know, the updates have been sparse, but it’s mostly because I’m on vacation in Singapore and I thought I’d give myself a few days with which to lounge around and basically vegetate.

It didn’t actually happen — I still ended up doing work stuff even here — but it’s all good. Now that I don’t actually feel any pressure, I’ve relaxed enough to type up my interview with Lauren Oliver and put it up for you guys.

I was a little worried going into this interview as most of the questions I had prepared earlier had gotten asked during the meet and greet with fans at Powerbooks. I had to think up of new question right quick, and was really worried that Lauren would think they’re redundant and pointless.

Thankfully, Lauren didn’t think they were — or she was being extremely polite, ahahahaha — and I got to get out of this interview with my dignity intact. Enjoy the conversation under the cut, which includes: LGBT characters, Manolo Blahniks, and how Lauren Oliver is a pro-non-virgin.

Continue reading Ronreads interview: Lauren Oliver – Part 2

Book review: John Green’s “The Fault In Our Stars”

T-Cells attacking a cancer cell.

About three years ago, my dear friend Doni had to undergo chemotherapy for his cancer. As much as I’ve heard about cancer before, this was the first time that I was actually going to be face to face with it, in a manner of speaking.

It was horrible for me to look at, and I wasn’t even suffering through it. It just wasn’t acceptable to me that my friend — who if you know him, you’d know he’s the life of the party — was in the state that he was in.

My friend is better now, but I’ve avoided cancer “things” ever since because I honestly don’t know if I can handle it. When we interviewed the founder of Kythe for my real job and when the topic of visiting the kids came up, I just knew that I would not be able to do it.

That was why I was a little apprehensive about John Green’s “The Fault In Our Stars”. As much as cancer is a very painful reality for a lot of people, more often than not it just gets treated as a plot device to force tears out of readers or viewers A Walk to Remember. Admittedly, I never thought twice about it before, but my limited experience had me afraid that Green might end up trivializing something so painful for so many people.

Continue reading Book review: John Green’s “The Fault In Our Stars”