Tag Archives: neil gaiman

Ronreads interview: Junot Diaz

Unless you guys have been living under a rock lately, you probably all know that Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Diaz was in town recently for the second Manila International Literary Festival organized by the National Book Development Board and co-presented by National Book Store.

Getting to interview him for my newspaper job wasn’t just a big honor, it was also stressful beyond belief. See, I have this thing of melting down right in front of really established foreign writers. Since I know that these authors have done a lot of interviews before, I try to think of the most unique question that I can – which really just end up in disaster, as evidenced by my interview with Neil Gaiman.

For this interview, I tried not to do too much research lest I end up psyching myself out like I did with Neil Gaiman. Aside from reading “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” and a lengthy interview he did with the Harvard Advocate in 2009, I pretty much tried to go into the interview with as clean a slate as possible.

I don’t really know if that worked out in my favor or if it relaxed me any, because I was still very, very nervous on the day itself. If it weren’t for the fact that Junot was such a nice guy and such an enthusiastic speaker, I feel like I would have made quite an ass out of myself yet again.

Anyway, under the cut is the complete transcript of my interview with him, while you can find the article I wrote for the newspaper here. And if you guys stick around, I might even announce a little giveaway later on!

Continue reading Ronreads interview: Junot Diaz

Your week in books#24

  • Here’s a short and interesting clip where book cover designer Chip Kidd talks about how he designed the book jacket for Haruki Murakami’s “1Q84”.
  • Following this Murakami route, there’s a really great profile of him on the New York Times. (Source)
  • Fans of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and H&M are in for a treat as the retail chain releases a clothing line inspired by the book and the upcoming Hollywood adaptation. (Source)
  • “A Game of Thrones” author George R. R. Martin talks about Peter Dinklage, the TV adaptation of his famous series, and how he sometimes turns to Westeros.org to keep his facts straight. (Source)
  • The Guardian takes a look at the latest ‘Sherlock Holmes” story penned by “Stormbreaker” author Anthony Horowitz. (Source)
  • Check out this great illustration of Batman battling all his foes at the Wayne Manor! (Source)
  • Finally, “Harry Potter” characters drawn as hipsters. (Source)
  • Edited to add: “Hunger Games” character posters under the cut!

Continue reading Your week in books#24

Your week in books#23

  • Of course, the big news is Nicholas Sparks’ impending arrival on our fair islands. Check him out at The Podium on October 28, 5 p.m.!
  • In much more controversial news, there’s been quite a ruckus over this year’s American National Book Awards’ finalists. “Shine”, a gay-themed YA novel revolving around a hate crime committed in the South, was removed from the list of nominees and replaced with “Chime”, a YA novel about a teen witch. The reason? Organizers misheard the title of the book. Messy, messy, messy. (Source 1, Source 2, Source 3, Source 4)
  • I don’t know what the age range of the readers of the blog are, but I am certainly old enough to remember the mindfuck that was the 1988 anime movie adaptation of the groundbreaking manga. And since Hollywood can’t leave good things alone, they’re apparently remaking the classic into a live action adaptation — set in Neo Manhattan. Rumored to play Kaneda? Garrett Hedlund from “Tron Legacy”. And as cute as I think he is, couldn’t anyone have found somebody Asian for a movie titled “Akira”? I mean, what the fuck. (Source)
  •  Julian Barnes wins the Man Booker Prize! (Source)
  • The Guardian lists down all of the authors who have expressed for the now global Occupy movement. Some of the big names include Salman Rushdie, Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, Jonathan Lethem, and Ursula K. Le Guin. (Source)
  • In a development that Bram Stoker himself could have written, one of Stoker’s descendants find an old notebook of his that offer “cryptic clues” to his own work. (Source)
  • Finally, “Immortals” is shaping up to be the must-see mythology inspired movie of the decade, at least by my standards. Kellan Lutz, who is playing the role of Poseidon, gives an interview to The Advocate that totally panders to the gay audience.  Now I’ll totally paner to you guys and include some shirtless Kellan Lutz pictures under the cut! (Source)

Continue reading Your week in books#23

Book review: Erin Morgenstern’s “The Night Circus”

When “The Night Circus”, Erin Morgenstern’s debut novel, first made its way onto the bookstore shelves less than a month ago, it came with the sort of buzz and marketing that would make any reader’s eyebrows shoot straight up.

Aside from comparisons to “Harry Potter” and “Twilight”, the publicity machine behind “The Night Circus” was also putting it in the same league as New York Times’ bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Susanna Clarke. The hype was further intensified when film rights to the novel were snapped up by Summit Entertainment, the same group behind the “Twilight” series of films.

Now that “The Night Cirucs” has come into town, readily available on your local bookstore’s shelves, will it live up to the immense expectations set by its own advance press? Or will all prove to be just smoke and mirrors in the end?

Continue reading Book review: Erin Morgenstern’s “The Night Circus”

Book review: Sarah Blakley-Cartwright’s “Red Riding Hood”

To be honest, the only reason I even thought of picking up this book was because of the trailer. I’m the easiest person to market stuff to: just mention that there’s going to be some shirtless boys with accents in your product and I will be good to go.

However, making life decisions based on the availability of attractive guys hasn’t always worked out very well for me in the past. It was precisely because of “Hot-Guys-On-Book-Covers” that I ended up reading such delightful reading material like Becca Fitzpatrick’s “Hush, Hush” and Holly Black’s “White Cat“.

Would “Red Riding Hood” be a similar disappointment?

Continue reading Book review: Sarah Blakley-Cartwright’s “Red Riding Hood”

My comic book childhood

If it wasn’t clear from my numerous posts on “Lost Girls“, let me say it straight to everybody: I grew up on comic books.

I think my relation ship with comic books started in much the same way it did for a lot of middle class Filipino kids — from reading those Filipino serials that they used to rent out to everybody back in my home province of Marinduque. Nights would be spent that way: gathered around a pile of komiks and just reading.

Marvel, DC, and everything in between