Tag Archives: sylvia plath

Your week in books#37

  • The Hollywood Reporter talks to Daniel Radcliffe, Jack Huston, and Ben Foster about “Kill Your Darlings”, a film about legendary Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. It’s already premiered at Sundance and is apparently being received positively. (Source)
Chris Kluwe
Chris Kluwe
  • In case you guys still don’t know who Chris Kluwe is, he’s the Minnesota Vikings punter who became famous when he stood up for fellow American football player Brendon Ayanbadejo, free speech, and marriage equality with an eloquent letter published in Deadspin and The Huffington Post. He also popularized the term “lustful cockmonster” and was named Salon’s Sexiest Man of 2012. ANYWAY, all of those links are to make sure you guys are all sufficiently intrigued to check out his book “Beautifully Unique Sparkleponies”, which will probably come out June 25. (Source)
  • It’s the 50th anniversary of the publication of Sylvia Plath’s “The Bell Jar”, and the Guardian has a couple of articles about the Plath and the people she left behind. One is about one of Plath’s close friends, Elizabeth Sigmund, while the other is a verbatim interview with Olwyn Hughes, Plath’s sister-in-law and literary executor. Olwyn and Sylvia didn’t like each other very much, and that really comes across when you read the interview with Olwyn. (Source 1)(Source 2)
  • Wired has an incredibly detailed analysis of the contract Bilbo signed in “The Hobbit”. (Source)
  • io9 has a great ongoing series on pulp science fiction during periods of totalitarianism that you guys should definitely check out. (Source)
  • Still with io9, they have a list of SF authors talking about the books they wish they’d written themselves. (Source)
  • In Scotland, they have free pole-dancing classes in the library. The library is definitely OPEN. (Source)
  • Have you read some Frankensteinbeck recently? Check out these illustrated literary puns! (Source)
  • I have honestly not read any stuff by Kieron Gillen, but I do love me some Young Avengers. The Guardian’s got a list of work that he’s done, and Phonogram certainly looks interesting! I’m now excited to pick up Young Avengers this week! (Source)
  • And in a somewhat Avengers-related vein, did you guys know that Sebastian Stan — Bucky from “Captain America: The First Avenger” — is on Broadway right now in a production of William Inge’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “Picnic”? He’s apparently shirtless in most of it. And trust me when I say you should check out what he looks like shirtless after the jump. (Source)

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Your week in books#36

albumnikenkoy2004

  • It’s Kenkoy‘s birthday today! (Source)
  • The shortlist for the Man Asian literary prize has been announced, and it features two authors who’ve already clashed during the Man Booker. (Source)
  • The New York Times has a fascinating piece on the book boys of Mumbai. (Source)
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Sylvia Plath
  • The Independent has an article on the Sylvia Plath “curse”. Fascinating stuff, especially when it comes to the Hughes side of the equation. (Source)
  • Friends of mine know I love me some fries from McDonalds as much as I love my books. In the UK, they’ve put those two things together. Why do I live here again? (Source)
  • Will everything we own end up in the cloud? The Independent talks about a generation that has dumped paper books for Kindles, among other things. (Source)
  • The Guardian seems to think that The Independent is right, as it reports that the sale of printed books in the UK has sunk to a nine-year low. (Source)
  • Saladin Ahmed, author of “Throne of the Crescent Moon“, writes about world-building in fantasy fiction over at National Public Radio. (Source)
  •  Thoughts that went through my head while reading Flavorpill’s 30 Most Anticipated Books fo 2013: “Oooh, new Maurice Sendak! NEW NABOKOV WAT?!? OMG FINALLY NEW MARISHA PESSL (possibly)!” (Source)
  • Take a look at these examples of literary graffiti from all over the world. (Source)

Your week in books#30

  • When I was a lot younger, I was really into the film “Snow Falling On Cedars”, so much so that I had to cut back on my obsessive buying of buttered corn (Don’t ask.) just so I could save up to buy a copy of the book. More than a decade later (!), I still haven’t gotten around to reading the book, and David Guterson has won the Literary Review’s “Bad Sex in Fiction” award. (Source)
  • Should I be worried that Amazon has acquired Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books? (Source)
  • Aside from buying Marshall Cavendish, Amazon is also investing $6 million dollars for the authors who participate in its Kindle Lending Library. (Source)
  • I have to admit that as of late, my resistance to ebooks and ebook readers has been slowly but surely deteriorating. I’ve been eyeing the Kindle Fire for a while now, and if I get my finances in order — probably sometime the next millennium — I may actually get one. So what to do when even diehard “solid book” fans like myself are considering changing sides? Publishers seem to have decided that making books prettier is the answer. (Source)

 

Jane Austen?
  • That painting over there is supposedly Jane Austen, author of “Pride and Prejudice”, “Sense and Sensibility”, and “Emma”. Certainly looks better than the other famous Jane Austen portrait, where she looks like she just noticed someone farted in the drawing room. (Source)
  • In England, poet laureate Ted Hughes — who most people probably know more as Sylvia Plath’s husband — is being honored with a slab at Westminster Abbey. (Source)
  • I was introduced to the works of Kurt Vonnegut by Taylor Hanson (Don’t ask.), and I’ve loved his works ever since. Even the new biography that paints him as a bitter, angry man with a temper isn’t going to change that. (Source)
  • FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT. Here’s what “Watchmen”, “V for Vendetta” and “Lost Girls” creator Alan Moore has to say about “300” author Frank Miller (TEAM ALAN MOORE!) (Source):

“Frank Miller is someone whose work I’ve barely looked at for the past 20 years. I thought the Sin City stuff was unreconstructed misogyny; 300 [a 1998 comic book series] appeared to be wildly ahistoric, homophobic and just completely misguided. I think that there has probably been a rather unpleasant sensibility apparent in Frank Miller’s work for quite a long time.”