Tag Archives: the shoebox project

Your week in books#35

  • The best way to describe the above video is through the words of Tumblr user and The Shoebox Project co-author, Rave:

“Okay I’ve been sitting on this knowledge for months and months, because ever since realizing none of my other friends had seen “North and South,” I have regarded Richard Armitage as my personal property/cross to bear. (KEEP HIM SECRET! KEEP HIM SAFE!!!) However, the time has come for you to know this: there is an audiobook of Richard Armitage reading classic regency romance “Venetia,” by Georgette Heyer, and it’s mercy status.

Like, is this the best Heyer in the world? Nah! Is the hero kind of unfortunately rapey in that way Georgette’s heroes sometimes veer toward where of course the heroine secretly likes it? Sure, a little! Is this audiobook Richard Armitage rumbling tenderly in your ear at every possible vibration, for five hours? You bet your sweet dixie cup ass it is!!! Cross your legs on the bus and blush through your daily commute, because this is HAPPENING to you. (BONUS: Richard Armitage also plays such characters as a sexy debutante and a tearful upper-crust matron. IT IS AMAZING!)”

Continue reading Your week in books#35

Your week in books #10

  • If the people on my Twitter feed are to be believed, the biggest news of the day is the death of the Oxford comma. My response is to quote The Shoebox Project:

“Good advice though it may be, I am choosing to ignore all of it, since I have created a personal grammar that adheres to my needs both moral and punctuational. After all, with the world in its current lamentable state, I sincerely believe that rather than WASTING commas with the rest of my fat capitalist pig brothers on frivolous consumerist sentences like these, they should be donated to the more needy, such as the chinese, who as I understand it have NO COMMAS AT ALL.”

  • Another big development online has been the quiet launch of Google+, the search engine giant’s attempt to dislodge Facebook from its social networking throne. While my initial wanderings on it have just made me realize it is Facebook without the annoying apps, Galleycat has been much more productive and outlined a few ways that the new Google product can be useful to writers, readers, and publishers. (Source)
  • The Guardian has a list of phrases that should be considered cliche and meaningless, at least according to poets participating in the Ledbury Poetry Festival. Great, as I wasn’t worried enough about which phrases to use to not sound like some cliche-spewing robot. (Source)
  • Finally, plagiarism! While not on the scale of Kaavya Viswanathan — Viswanathan’s book actually got published — there has apparently been a plagiarist on the loose on the wilds of the Internet. Somebody named Angela Priest has been taking published work, changing the character names, and passing them off as her own work. She’s not earning any money from it, but that is still some messed-up shit. The “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” background isn’t helping her out either. (Source 1, Source 2)